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20120928
20121006
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
services. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose. in new york, norah o'donnell is in washington. israel's prime minister is sending the world a clear warning. benjamin netanyahu told the united nations thursday that iran will have enough enriched uranium next summer to start building a nuclear weapon. >> president obama is likely to discuss that speech with netanyahu today. the white house says the two leaders will speak on the phone. netanyahu met with secretary of state hillary clinton thursday after his speech. >> margaret brennan watched the speech. good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you, charlie. the israeli prime minister made a public appeal to the u.n. to set a firm ultimatum on iran to stop the nuclear development. he put pressure on the obama administration to take a tougher tone weeks ahead of the u.s. presidential election. >> reporter: israel's rhetorical red line. >> a red line should be drawn right here. >> reporter: became a literal one as prime minister benjamin netanyahu took to the u.n. general assembly with a red marker and a
protective services. >>> welcome to cbs this morning, i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'danell in new york. israel's prime minister is sending the world a clear warning. on thursday, he said that iran will have enough enriched uranium by next summer to start making nuclear weapons by next summer. >> the two leaders will speak on the phone. netanyahu met with hillary clinton on thursday. margaret brennan watched the speech at the united nations. good morning. >> good morning, charlie, the israeli prime minister made a very public appeal to the u.n. to set a firm ultimatum to stop iran's nuclear development. he put pressure on the obama administration to take a tougher tone weeks ahead of the u.n. general election. >> israel's rhetorical red line. >> a red line should be drawn right here. >> became a literal one as prime minister benjamin netanyahu took to the u.n. general assembly with a red marker and a chart that says is iran's progress toward a nuclear weapon. >> red lines prevent war and faced with a clear red line, iran will back down. >> the prime minister's speech put in stark r
on the middle east, the arab spring and iran when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: new york city this week was the site of two major global conferences, one the united nations general assembly in which representatives of the nations who are members of the general assembly come here, including heads of state and foreign ministers and others at the clinton global initiative, business and government and ngo s were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. one of the problems they talked about at both places was syria. another was middle east protest about a film that attacked mohammed and the third was iran and nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the pos
can see individual questions all sorted by topic. c-span.org/debates. on thursday, charlie cook, editor of the cook political report, called the debate a game changer for romney speaking at an event hosted by the national journal including pollsters. this is one hour, 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. if i could invite you to take your seats. we're going to go ahead and get started. thank you all for joining us here on this rather cumin thursday. thank you to everyone joining us on the lives dream -- live stream on nationaljournal.com and on c-span2. my name is victoria. i'm a senior vice president and it's a pleasure to welcome you to this wonderful discussion this morning. before we get started, just a few items to give you a sense of what is coming. charlie will be here in a moment and he will give us his take on last night's debate. he will be joined by two guests after who will also offer their perspectives on the debate and the upcoming elections. we are grateful to all of our participants this morning who will take questions so think about what you would like to ask
with charlie. i'm sorry. with linda eads. >> we made this decision earlier. >> she works as a provost. [laughter] >> charlie is always asking me for money and i never give it to him. [laughter] >> welcome the wanted me to start first because i am going to talk about the law and i am going to bore you for five minutes. but they only gave me five minutes because of that. but there are two ideas i really want to put forward here. in some ways i think i am going to go to a point further than sandra did. i want to talk about with the constitutional issue of privacy, and then i met to talk about how the constitution results to a struggle between freedom of religion and the right of government to regulate society even when such regulations may interfere with religious doctrines because those are two points that are important here. there was a time in this country before 1965 when it was okay for a state to outlaw the use of contraceptions by married couples. several states had been for years. they were lingering on the books for years and finally the supreme court in a case called griswold v
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)